In curio

It may have been difficult to turn around without spilling your wine because of the large crowd on the 23rd, but there was little doubt that everyone was wide-eyed with amazement as they previewed the 27 beautiful historic harpsichords and pianos from 1748 to 1857 in the museum’s opening exhibit, Facing South.  Two students from the doctoral program in Historic Keyboard’s at the University of North Carolina-Greensboro, Robin Morace and Stephanie Schmidt, along with their major professor and program head, Dr. Andrew Willis, entertained the guests throughout the evening with selections played on three of the instruments: on the first floor Robin played the 1845 Broadwood Grand, known as the “Chopin Grand”, and Dr. Willis played the the 1825 Johann Schanz grand–a piano that would have been well-known to Beethoven. On the second floor, home of the “squares”, Stephanie played the 1834 Nunns, Clark and Co. square piano, or the “Eliza Lyles” piano, which has one of the great Facing South stories in the museum.  You must come by to hear it!

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